Category Archives: Painting

Talking About Tom Wesselmann

Howdy!

Stéphane Aquin and Andres Duran talking about the retrospective exhibits of work by American Pop Artist Tom Wesselmann at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal and Galerie de Bellefeuille.

EZ Montreal Art Podcast: Les Plasticiens & Art Mur

Howdy!

The Plasticiens and Beyond. Montreal 1955-1970. An exhibit at The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec
The Plasticiens and Beyond. Montreal 1955-1970. An exhibit at The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec

The EZ Montreal Art Podcast: Les Plasticiens & Art Mur

Listen (39:41):

Download: Ogg Vorbis 25MB, MP3 52MB, Flac 157MB, WAV 401MB.

In season two, episode five of the EZ Montreal Art Podcast, Eloi Desjardins and Chris ‘Zeke’ Hand discuss The Plasticiens and Beyond. Montreal 1955-1970. An exhibit at The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec along with the four exhibits at Art Mur; Renato Garza Cervera: Springbreaker Tsantsas, Bevan Ramsay: Soft Tissue, Sonny Assu : #NeverIdle, and Cooke-Sasseville: Built Heritage.

Email us at ezmontrealart@gmail.com to answer the trivia question and win a prize!!
Continue reading EZ Montreal Art Podcast: Les Plasticiens & Art Mur

Pierre Dorion Talking About his Exhibit at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal

Howdy!

Last November I had the chance to interview Pierre Dorion about the exhibit he had at the Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal and about his practice. I was finally able to finish editing it over the holidays. If you have a spare 37 minutes to watch, I think hope you might like it.

or if you prefer YouTube to Archive.org

Either way I’d suggest watching it on a fullscreen as the native resolution is 1280 x 720, and it was filmed in HD.

The EZ Montreal Art Podcast. Episode 13: Pierre Dorion; Barry Allikas; Sayeh Sarfaraz, Eve K. Tremblay, Mathieu Levesque, Guy Boutin

Howdy!

In today’s episode Chris ‘Zeke’ Hand and Eloi Desjardins from Un Show de Mot’Arts discuss the Pierre Dorion, Barry Allikas and Sayeh Sarfaraz exhibits in Griffintown at Galerie Rene Blouin, Galerie Division and Galerie Antoine Ertaskiran. Along with exhibitions by Eve K. Tremblay at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Mathieu Levesque at Galerie Trois Points and Guy Boutin at Espace Robert Poulin, all in the Belgo Building.

The EZ Montreal Art Podcast episode 13

Listen (34:14):

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download: Ogg Vorbis 21MB, MP3 32MB, Flac 112MB, WAV 346MB.

Specifically (and beyond the artists and galleries) The Arsenal, the impending Galerie Rene Blouin move, Shirin Neshat, the War in the Middle East, Bourgeois exhibits vs. Political exhibits, Attendance Figures, Ray Bradbury (who is not Canadian), Saul Bellow, Frank Gehry, Thinking too much, Talking with Hugues Charbonneau, the Agac Awards, The next EZ Montreal Art Podcast, Gordon Matta Clark, Roger Bellemare, Pierre Trahan, the Collection Majudia, Designing a meal, the fact that Eloi doesn’t like cartooning, then Zeke tries to inquire as to the root of why Eloi doesn’t like Guy Boutin’s work, the Comix and Bande Dessine scene, Fabric art, the Sympathy for the Devil exhibit at MACM, Free tickets and the Trivia Question (remember if you email ezmontrealart@gmail.com the answer, you can win an amazing prize!)

If you would like to hear the previous episodes of The EZ Montreal Art Podcast click here: Episode 12, Episode 11, Episode 10, Episode 9, Episode 8, Episode 7, Episode 6, Episode 5, Episode 4, Episode 3, Episode 2, Episode 1.

The EZ Montreal Art Podcast. Episode 12: The Canadian Biennale 2012; The Builders/Les bâtisseurs

Howdy!

In today’s episode Chris ‘Zeke’ Hand and Eloi Desjardins from Un Show de Mot’Arts discuss The Canadian Biennale 2012; The Builders/Les bâtisseurs.

The EZ Montreal Art Podcast episode 12

Listen (33:38):

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download: Ogg Vorbis 19MB, MP3 27MB, Flac 84MB, WAV 340MB.

Specifically Marc Mayer, Edward Burtynsky, Michael Snow, broken art exhibited in museums, Qavavau Manumie, Headbutting, how the Canadian Bienniale 2012 is a colaboration between three museums, the annoying title, Dil Hildebrand, the layout and set up of the exhibit, the price of admission, Lynne Cohen, Max Dean, David Altmejd, the prices for Canadian art, Terence Gower, Chairs, Video Art, Headphones, HG Wells, Buckminster Fuller, Scripts, Parliament/Funkadelic, Aznan France, Zeke’s adolescence, Lynne Marsh, the waitress makes an interruption and Zeke goes to pay the bill, Marcel Dzama, David Hoffos, Wayne Baerwaldt (and it was Scott Burnham who walked out on the Montreal Bienniale), Young & Giroux, Jim Breukelman, Jon Pylypchuk, Brian Jungen, Michel De Broin, the surprising amount of artists in the show who have not exhibited in Montreal, Mark Soo, Benoît Aquin, 1972 Baseball Cards, Sarah Anne Johnson, Michael Merrill, Zeke’s nephew’s drawings, Winnie the Pooh, Marcel Duchamp, Bruce Nauman, Fluxus, Dada, The Clock, the Montreal Biennale, Manif d’art, Mois de la photo, Via Rail ticket sale, a suggestion for Marc Mayer, and the trivia question.

If you would like to hear the previous episodes of The EZ Montreal Art Podcast click here: Episode 11, Episode 10, Episode 9, Episode 8, Episode 7, Episode 6, Episode 5, Episode 4, Episode 3, Episode 2, Episode 1.

The EZ Montreal Art Podcast, episode 8: Sylvain Bouthillette, L’Art du Style, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Galerie de Bellefeuille

Howdy!

Last month, Eloi Desjardins from Un Show de Mot’Arts and I got together to talk about Sylvain Bouthillette‘s 15 Hertz exhibit at Galerie Trois Points, L’Art du Style at Les Ailes de la Mode, The New Sculpture Garden at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and Beyond Photorealism at Galerie de Bellefeuille.

The EZ Montreal Art Podcast episode 8

Listen (35:00):

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download: Ogg Vorbis 22MB, MP3 34MB, Flac 119MB, WAV 353MB.

Installation view of Sylvain Bouthillette's 15 Hertz at Galerie Trois Points
Installation view of Sylvain Bouthillette’s 15 Hertz at Galerie Trois Points
Flavie Boucher's entry in L'Art du Style at Les Ailes de la Mode
Flavie Boucher’s entry in L’Art du Style at Les Ailes de la Mode
View of the New Sculpture Garden at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal
View of the New Sculpture Garden at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal

Unfortunately I do not have any pictures from Beyond Photorealism at Galerie de Bellefeuille.

If you would like to hear the previous episodes of The EZ Montreal Art Podcast click here: Episode 7, Episode 6, Episode 5, Episode 4, Episode 3, Episode 2, Episode 1.

Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain

Howdy!

Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view
Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view

Mr. Hildebrand is a significant and important contemporary Canadian painter. It’s obvious because his most recent exhibit was reviewed in Canadian Art magazine (written by no less than the editor-in-chief!), Le Devoir and one of Louise Blouin’s magazines. The only things that could make him a more important and significant contemporary Canadian painter would be a review/write-up/preview in ArtForum, the New York Times/New Yorker/New York Review of Books, or some publication in London, Paris Berlin or Shanghai.

This is both a good thing and a bad thing. It’s a good thing mainly because he is a very accomplished artist, looking at his work, I get a very strong sense that not only does he know what he wants to do, but he know how to accomplish it as well. There’s nothing namby-pamby about his work. Adjectives like forthright, bold, strong and direct are the ones that I would think of using in order to describe his work. It’s a bad thing because he only gets reviewed in local media outlets and his paintings sell for a song (The work in this exhibit was selling in between $800 and $15,500 depending on size, and how much (or how little) color there was). Both of these are examples of (apologies for repeating myself here) how little respect Canadian/Quebecois/Montreal art gets in the rest of the world. Mr. Hildebrand has exhibited in Auckland, Beijing, Chicago, Los Angeles and Miami, among other places, and will be exhibiting in London but there is nary a peep in anything other than the good old Canadian intelligentsia about his work. It’s frustrating. It’s getting to the point where I’m beginning to question if Canadian art really is truly good art. Or if what is being called good is merely a function of myopia. (As an aside, I think I should point out and say that it is a good thing that I wear glasses).

But enough about the politics (at least for the time being) and on to the art. In all the other reviews that I’ve read and in the artist statement that accompanies the show, a big deal is made out of the use of the color green. While I understand both the significance, historical antecedents and reasons Mr. Hildebrand states for using green (“the chalkboard, the cutting mat, or the green-screen”) given that almost 40% of the show were drawings in a sort of architectural bent. Simple gray lines on a cream colored paper, I’m not certain I’m drinking that Kool-aid. I’d much prefer to put my emphasis on the title and the works themselves.

Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view of Reconstruction 01 and Net Structures 01, 02 and 03.
Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view of Reconstruction 01 and Net Structures 01, 02 and 03.

I think I’ve always been a big fan of drawing. Maybe because I can’t do it to save my life, or perhaps because of the simplicity of the act, or maybe I’m just full of it, and in fact I never really liked drawing ever. But for purposes of this argument, let stick with the positive for whatever reasons. Mr. Hildebrand’s drawings are of some extraordinary objects that at first appear to be some kind of structure. Something like the plans for a house of cards, an aerial view of some maze or now that I think about it the kite like structures from John Horton Conway’s mathematical Game of Life a representation of Pick-Up Sticks.

Viewed from a distance (and from my memory) the polytopes seem to form some sort of pattern. Not quite Penrose tiling but close. And I’m certain if I stared at them long enough I would be able to come up with some kind of mathematical formula to describe what they were doing.

Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view of Replicating 02
Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view of Replicating 02

By calling the show “Back to the Drawing Board,” Mr. Hildebrand is tacitly admitting that whatever was done prior didn’t quite work out the way he intended. I can’t help but think that the repetition of forms helped in finally getting the finished product the way he wanted. It’s almost as if you can see the process taking place even though the drawing in front of you is complete. Despite the simplicity of the drawings they are extremely powerful and even a full month after seeing the show I can still imagine them in my mind as if I had seen them half an hour ago.

The actual paintings in the exhibit, the things with the color green in them, did not affect me as strongly. It’s easy enough to see how they are related to the drawings, but I did not get a visceral sense of anything from looking at them. They almost appeared to be some kind of academic exercise, which is surprising as the drawings, when viewed from a technical standpoint could be considered by anyone’s definition academic exercises. I think that it might have something to do with the fact that, for the most part, the paintings are titled as objects (Compartment, Contraption, Module, Parabola, Spire) while the drawings, for the most part, are titled as actions (Reconstruction, Dismantling, Replicating). But then again, since grammar was (and still is) not my strongest subject and I’m picking a choosing titles that fit my theory, I could be very wrong.

Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view
Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view

And then there is Treehouse. A glorious painting if there ever was one. As you might expect I’m not entirely convinced it is a representation of a actual tree-house. To me it looks more like an imagined memory of what a tree-house was, or could be. Or more precisely like a collection of doors. Doors that are unlocked with the key of imagination.

But I digress…

Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view of Treehouse
Dil Hildebrand, Back to the Drawing Board (Reprise), Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Installation view of Treehouse

More white than green, with some brown thrown in for good measure, it seems like some sort of gateway. I’m not certain how it fits in with the title, unless you go for the Helen Keller (or Alexander Graham Bell) quote about doors opening and closing, which I would have sworn was Zen or Buddhist and not American. But even then it’s kind of a stretch. I think the reason I like it has more to do with the form and structure of the painting than the actual content. It has a certain heft, that by extension makes it feel important.

I could kick in here with the cheesy puns and talk about how if Mr. Hildebrand doesn’t at first succeed, but I’ll avoid that. I also would like to try and figure out some way to link either his paintings or the drawings or both to some sort of hope or possibility of him being able to make it as a Canadian Artist (with the capital C and A) but I’ve been wracking my brain for the past hour and half trying to figure out some sort of way to tie things up neatly so it looks like I know what the heck I’m talking about. But I can’t, for the life of me think of anything. So I’m going to have to leave it like this, kind of dangling and not quite perfectly polished.