Jacynthe Carrier, Rites

Howdy!

A 12 minute three channel video of what I don’t know
Which is 11 minutes and two chanels de trop.
But it must be great it’s on the cover
Of the catalogue. I want to know who is her lover?

I saw the part with a bunch of ribbons
Then stopped watching after the fourth of my yawns.

I‘m certain it’s great art and deserves some respect
But I wonder how much is due to it being owned by Hydro-Quebec?
They gave the musee d’art contemporain a half a million bucks
My guess is that now, people say their collection no longer sucks.

Jessica Eaton, Photographs

Howdy!

This is where things can get sort of embarrassing
Sadly of Ms. Eaton’s work I cannot remember a thing.
I know I saw it, her name is there in my notes
I even wrote “nice prints” as one of my quotes.

But that doesn’t really help when I’m trying to describe
What her work looked like or if it gave off any sort of vibe.
So I plead mea culpa
Look straight at the camera and take a big gulpa

I obviously didn’t have an emotional connection
To Ms. Eatons’ work, and after some reflection
And seeing copies of her work on the internet
I’m not certain if it is something I regret.

Alexandre David, Une ou deux places

Howdy!

[M.] David appears to love plywood
A common form of building material frequently misunderstood.
Unvarnished and unpainted
It’s a type of wood to which everyone is acquainted.

Using it to make false floors and fake walls
M. David succeeds in transforming one the the museum’s halls
From something clean and pristine
To something rough and less clean.

Depending on where you started, this might be the last piece of art you see in the show,
And right after it there’s a collection of catalogues to look at which is kind of apropos,
Unlike other museums when the show is finished there is no store.
It is one of the things about the Musée d’art contemporain that I adore.

Marie-Andrée Cormier, Paysage Humain II

Howdy!

Moving luggage one at a time in a choreographed human chain
Surprisingly this two channel video, my attention it did sustain.
Two screens at a right angle, the videos are each a long static shot
Other than moving the boxes, there’s nothing really that can be called “plot.”

One by one they come in, one by one they leave
They pile the gear up, they break the gear down, it’s kind of naive.
But nonetheless we stuck around to the bitter end
Sometimes surreal stuff can be hard to hard to comprehend.

Olivia Boudreau, L’Étuve

Howdy!

A video of some women hanging around in a steam bath
After one glance I look at the wall tag and do some math
If I hang around for the twenty-minutes to watch the entire thing
I’ll get angry, stomp out and end up missing
Most of the rest of the exhibition

Which would put me in an awkward position
Of having to be rhymey
About things I had not seen, which is kind of slimy.
So I only watched five minutes, which was more than enough
To give me this material in case anyone calls my bluff.

Olivia Boudreau, Excerpt from L'Étuve

Matthew Biederman, Guided Saccade

Howdy!

Triangles are a three sided polygon
What you see is what’s shown
Saccade is the fancy word for fast eye movement
Art by Matthew Biederman still has room for improvement.

Three screens at the end of the the hallway
Showing about 108 Right Triangles in an array
I remember “square of the length of the hypotenuse”
If I look closely I’m certain at least one of them is chartreuse.

Mr. Biederman used some kind of computerized tool
To make the triangles move and twist on an irregular schedule
Your eyes follow the motion
Guided Saccade lacks all emotion.

Sophie Bélair Clément, Proun Room

Howdy!

A box in a box with some sense of history
Sometimes Russian Constructivism is just a mystery.
What El Lissitzky did in 1923 might be obvious to some
Since I had to look it up, it’s obvious that I’m just plain dumb.

A copy of a copy of a room filled with abstract symbols, the room Proun
When stripped of the art, might as well be a ruin.
To see the original copy you need to go to Eindhoven
I can’t figure out why the copy of the copy (without the art) was chosen.

Trying to understand who made what choices to exhibit and why
Sometimes it looks like demand was less than supply.
Thankfully in the Triennale there’s a awful lot of art all in one place
There’s always more to see (that could be better) in the worst case.